» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

Pages: (3) < 1 [2] 3 >

[ Track this topic :: Email this topic :: Print this topic ]

Topic: Welcome!, Safety is #1, #2 and #3...< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
PALADIN Offline
Marlin




Group: Members
Posts: 616
Joined: Feb. 2004
Posted: Mar. 02 2007,03:34

good job phoneman!!

--------------
Tight Lines and Tail Winds
               Mike
Back to top
Profile PM 
Capn Jimbo Offline
The Godfisher




Group: Super Administrators
Posts: 1712
Joined: Jan. 2004
Posted: Mar. 02 2007,04:28

Going offshore is another matter indeed.  Floatation might be another essential.  Another note:  having a cell phone is good; better yet is a waterproof marine VHF.  If you are in distress you are far more likely to get quick help as this is monitored by many boats, the coast guard and the tow boats, especially in your area.

If you are concerned about being found - and a kayak is a mighty small object to be found at sea - a GPS so you can relay your position would be essential.

Last, it is so important to know the winds.  I never went out when offshore winds (blowing out) were a possibility.  It's hard enough fighting your way back in without winds blowing you to sea.  Keep in mind that winds are circular (around a high or esp. a low) so they will change as the front passes.

Oh - and letting someone know your float plan is excellent.  Arrange that if you are not back by a time certain, that someone will notify the coast guard if they do not hear from you.  


:capn:


Edited by Capn Jimbo on Mar. 02 2007,04:34

--------------
Tight lines,
Capn Jimbo

Link to FLYC Main Site
Link to Member Map
New Posts! (also top of page)
Back to top
Profile PM 
phoneman Offline
Tarpon




Group: Members
Posts: 129
Joined: Mar. 2006
Posted: Mar. 02 2007,12:14

Great advice Jimbo, I always let the wife know where I put in and who I'm with (name, cell number, color yak) I plan on buying a hand-held waterproof VHF this summer in time for the off shore fishing and my next project is to get a GPS/Fish-Finder installed on my Drifter. And my cell phone is in a water-proof cover also  :;): Plus I never go off shore alone, its just not smart. even the strongest paddler can have an accident.

Capt. this would be a good topic for our next SEKFC meeting March 22nd @ Kayak Jeff's :cool:


--------------
"The Green Machine Fishing Team"

"HOOK-EM"


www.certifiedcom.com
Your Telecom Source for all VoIP & More
plykins@certifiedcommunications.com
Back to top
Profile PM AOL 
PALADIN Offline
Marlin




Group: Members
Posts: 616
Joined: Feb. 2004
Posted: Mar. 02 2007,18:11

I like the Inflatable by MTI...Kayak Jeff has them.


:cool:


--------------
Tight Lines and Tail Winds
               Mike
Back to top
Profile PM 
Capn Jimbo Offline
The Godfisher




Group: Super Administrators
Posts: 1712
Joined: Jan. 2004
Posted: Mar. 03 2007,08:07

Nice post.  My inflatable is by Revere - $119 - but comes with a built-in whistle, and water activated strobe (both removeable).  More padding on the neck.  Very nice.

Personally I like the idea of inflatables, best of both worlds.  Brief caveat though, which is that when inflated, they are equivalent to Type 1's - the best insofar as survival, but harder to reenter certain hard-to-mount designs like surfski's, most SIK's.  Probably not an issue with ordinary rec SOT's.

Of course, inflatables can also be partially deflated and reinflated manually with this in mind.  It is also possible to get an auto-inflating model if you are concerned about panic or being injured and unable to pull the "rip cord".

My take:  kayaks run slow, of course, so being thrown out at high speed is not an issue, so the manual rip-cord is fine with me.  I like em...


:capn:


--------------
Tight lines,
Capn Jimbo

Link to FLYC Main Site
Link to Member Map
New Posts! (also top of page)
Back to top
Profile PM 
PALADIN Offline
Marlin




Group: Members
Posts: 616
Joined: Feb. 2004
Posted: Mar. 03 2007,16:33

Quote
It is also possible to get an auto-inflating model if you are concerned about panic or being injured and unable to pull the "rip cord".

I really don't advise any yaker getting an auto-inflating model. If you're concerned about pulling a chord then get a traditional vest.

I got the MTI ($95) for one reason and one only...to give me a good chance.
If I was ever in a situation where I was either separted from my yak and couldn't reach it, was injured or needed to rescue someone.
Also it is cool in summer and easy to swim with uninflated if you need to reach your yak if you flip. And you might and you sure don't want your PFD going off on a little dump.

A PFD gives you a good chance in extreme conditions thats all.

To be a smart kayaker....Know how to reenter, practice proper paddling technque, and be safety minded.

Putting on a PFD whatever style it is, is not a band-aide for foolish actions.... it is one piece of the safety puzzle that when complete, gives you the best chance to be ready for any situation!!

:cool:


--------------
Tight Lines and Tail Winds
               Mike
Back to top
Profile PM 
randrums Offline
Cuda




Group: Members
Posts: 70
Joined: July 2004
Posted: Mar. 05 2007,07:40

I have a big yellow mesh gear bag that goes on every trip of any kind (touring/fishing/snorkeling/guiding/whatever). As I looked at this list, I realized everything in this "must take" bag is directly related to safety. Or comfort, which will become a safety issue if left unchecked. I may just set the whole bag in the tankwell/hatch, or break it up as I load the yak. Contents include:

submersible VHF radio in a dry box (redundant, but when you need it..........)
another dry box w/ID, cel phone, money, advil, fishing license
extra lines (1 short, 1 long) with clips for quick deployment - myriad of uses
BIG bottle of sunscreen
bug juice
a dry bag containing:
first aid kit
small clean towel (for first aid use)
complete set of xtra batteries for lights and radio
duct tape
rain pants and top
stocking hat
waterproof headlamp w/fresh batteries - pre-trip test every time

Other items that always go:
water enough for you, your friend(s) who say they won't need it, and an extra for first aid use
food bag - enough as above - clif bars are good and keep very well

Other items that always go on my person:
PFD - high quality, w/pockets, in screaming yellow
sun hat
polarized lenses
high quality, SHARP, blunt edged dive knife - mounted to PFD
signal mirror and whistle in PFD pockets

If running solo, I always wear my PFD. Every time. No matter what. Period. No exceptions. Do we need to cover this? :) If with qualified company and conditions are mellow, I'll sometimes take it off. But if I'm with real newbies (who couldn't offer me much assistance if I was in trouble) I just wear it every time. I've got a nice comfortable Lotus PFD with a mesh back and never really feel restricted in it.

These items may or may not go with me, depending on trip length, location and expected weather:

mounted white 360deg light
spare paddle (always have when solo)
compass and charts

Quite a list, I guess. But being a guide, I feel a sense of responsibility even when I'm just with friends, since I'm likely the most experienced person in the group. New kayakers are always leaving things at the dock, in the car, at home, etc. Or they think they "won't need it". I ask as we're loading up if they have things (water/food/sunscreen/hat/jacket) and can't tell you how many times folks have needed to use my stuff for their comfort/safety. Which is perfectly cool, since we'll all have to suffer or cut our trip short if someone isn't having fun because they're thirsty, sunburned, or being devoured by no-see-ums. As to the original question for this thread - that of "routine". I have the big yellow mesh bag for the first list of things; everything else can fit in a milkcrate - one trip if you do it right. And post trip rinse down is easy - just blast the bag and crate with the hose and let air dry.

If I'm fishing, a few more things become must have items. A lip gripper for keeping that big fish that you weren't expecting (if a big and/or toothy fish is boatside, this is invaluable; I recommend tying it to the yak with maybe 4' of line - enough to reach around the cockpit as needed; you can even let the gripper go for a minute to grab a camera or deal with your rod and still have your fish but tie it off somewhere other than the gunnels! a big fish could capsize you; and leaving struggling fish tied to your kayak could create a shark problem as well, so think this all through BEFORE you have that 50lb tarpon boatside) I mentioned a knife above. It needs to be secure and able to immediately deploy with one hand. If a big shark wants your catch, or your chumbag that's tied to the boat - cut the line quickly and let him have it. Another scenario is when you've hooked a fish that you want to keep; you can quickly cut the line and get the fish into the fishbag. I've lost a few big keepers because I was fiddling with hook removal and the fish struggled enough to get away. You know how they tend to get a burst of energy right as you pop the hook loose? Just cutting the line and dropping them in the bag will save you a few nice fish. Also, I consider a (quickly deployable) anchor a safety issue. I figure things are more likely to get hairy if I'm fishing rather than just paddling, and it will likely be during a battle with a large fish. If I'm being towed (or blown or swept by current) into danger I can drop the hook, though this is a last resort since it would be hard on the seafloor.

OK, those are some of my thoughts on "must have" gear. The "routine" part is in storage/transport. Just keep it all together and you'll always have everything. An if you paddle enough, you'll be glad you have it when you need it.


(Capn's Note: Thanks to Randy for a great post.  Well done and well considered)


Edited by Capn Jimbo on Mar. 05 2007,09:59
Back to top
Profile PM 
PALADIN Offline
Marlin




Group: Members
Posts: 616
Joined: Feb. 2004
Posted: Mar. 05 2007,17:46

Quote
(Capn's Note: Thanks to Randy for a great post.  Well done and well considered)


DITTO!!

:cool:


--------------
Tight Lines and Tail Winds
               Mike
Back to top
Profile PM 
valfitzandrew Offline
Snook




Group: Members
Posts: 46
Joined: Aug. 2005
Posted: Mar. 08 2007,04:39

I thought "The LAW" required that the pfd to be "on board" and "be available" to each passenger on the craft. It is "our" collective wisdom that says that it must be worn to be effective, SO WEAR IT!!

Enough said about the sound source. It's required, should be attached to your pfd and since you wear the pfd all the time you are "a sea", it is available.

The light is only required if you are operating after dark. It's a good idea to have a light source along in the event that circumstances cause you to be out longer than expected. (I have a tail about that and now carry one at all times)

I would add water, a liter min. You must be able to rehydrate. You may be out longer than expected.

What other safety gear do I take along?

Flip phone in a zip lock bag in one pocket of my pfd. This phone has a gps function so the 911 operator can locate me if they have that capability. Not all do.

Note: I have yet to install pool noodles in the boat. I'm thinking about it. Maybe the floatation bags used by sik_ers would be better, leaving internal stowage for rods and stuff. I carry one paddle and one Mirage Drive. The paddle is teathered to the boat. Don't think I need a spare. In deep open water the boat is teathered to me as I consider that next to the pfd, the boat itself is my most important piece of safety gear. In/on the flats I don't bother but I do have some line along to be used as a tow line or painter,  used in the event I have to manhandle the boat over mud flats. I wear a sharp knife but wont use it unless a parachute falls over me.

Everything else I take along is optional.:laugh:
Back to top
Profile PM 
valfitzandrew Offline
Snook




Group: Members
Posts: 46
Joined: Aug. 2005
Posted: Mar. 08 2007,04:52

BTW, yesterday, I saw in WalleyMart, an inflatable pfd for sale and kits to recharge them. Don't recall the price or trade name but the $$s seemed to be reasonable. In my opinion these things are great if you won't wear a good  foam type of pfd. Anything is better than nothing. Keep in mind if you wear them that they require maintenance despite anything the manufacturer writes. Military aviators who bet their a*** on such devices are supported by life support techs who take care of that stuff. You must do this for yourself to insure proper operation.:)
Back to top
Profile PM 
21 replies since Feb. 26 2007,09:24 < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track this topic :: Email this topic :: Print this topic ]

Pages: (3) < 1 [2] 3 >

Quick Reply: Welcome!
iB Code Buttons
You are Posting as:
Guest
Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code