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Topic: Sails are in!, And i'm comin home with one...< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
Capn Jimbo Offline
The Godfisher




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Posted: Nov. 09 2007,15:25



I don't get all that many calls from the famed Kayak Willie - and I sure don't get many excited ones.  Today I did.  

"The sails are in" he declared, "wanna go out and get some?".  Needless to say he didn't have to ask twice.  To go out for sails, and especially with The Man, is an offer I won't turn down. Ever.

So we're meetin tomorrow at 6:00 am, first stop to catch bait.  Willie is very particular about this, has to have live ballyhoo of a certain size, which he rigs a certain way, and fishes in a particular manner.  He used to do this by kayak - and successfully enough that he earned a national reputation long ago.  If ya wanna know how he did it:

Link to Kayak Willie Hall of Fame Interview

Tomorrow I'm gonna participate, learn and enjoy.  And I will return with a sail or I'll eat Fishheads Trident....


:capn:


Edited by Capn Jimbo on Nov. 09 2007,15:28

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Capn Jimbo Offline
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Posted: Nov. 10 2007,16:17

Well after shooting my mouth off, a report is in order...

Met Willie at 6:45 am, and he was ready.  For his motorboating needs Willie favors his Carolina Skiff (17') powered by a nice Yamaha 70.  It's not kind of craft you'd expect to see offshore, but Willie has the expertise to make it work well for him.  Its flat bottomed cockpit and raised flat forward section makes for the maximum use of space rail to rail, end to end.  

Willie carried ten rods this day.  Couple med weight rigs and a net to catch bait.  Two heavier rigs featuring Shimano 6500 Baitrunners, and a heavy rig with an older Penn International rigged with 30 lb.  Willie makes up his own terminal rigs consisting of about 8 feet of 100 lb mono, ending with a flexible woven wire leader with two single semi-circle hooks - one to hook the ballyhoo and the second as a short stinger.  He built his own rounded corner livebait well with circulating seawater.

First stop:  off the Pompano pier to catch live ballyhoo.  This was accomplished with the lighter rigs strung with 8 lb test (no leader), wine corks (Willie likes the way they cast and retrieve), followed by about 4 ft of line and terminating in a tiny J-hook.  He cuts squid into tiny 3/4 inch long strips.  The technique is to anchor - create a small slick of fish oil to draw the ballyhoo, and followed by a frequent handful of Quaker Oats flakes to keep em around.  The ballyhoo will continually draw closer to the boat.

His hoo catching technique is as follows (using the squid shreds).  Cast downwind/current maybe 30 feet or less.  Retrieve the cork very slowly, just enough to keep the squid moving and wiggling.  When you feel a series of taps/tugs, give it a "one thousand one" and then a light set and reel in constantly to bring the hoo close.  When about 8 feet of line remains, lift and swing the hoo into the boat (this minimizes the common last second loss of bait).  Into the well.

We quickly caught about 19 baits of varying sizes and left for deep water (maybe 160 feet) directly off the inlet to join a bunch of circling charters and monitoring a certain channel.

The hoo were hooked with the top hook through the mouth and down and out the gill slit and held with maybe 10 wraps of copper wire around the beak.   The stinger hung down maybe 8 inches or so.  Three baits were let out.  One back about 70 feet shallow (left), one about 40 or 50 deep and deeper (using a sinker, center) and one back about 50 feet shallow.  This setup allows Willie to very slow troll without crossing lines.  

Reels are kept in very light drag, click position.  Following a strike, the reel is free spooled (or bail released) so the bait will drop back.  The sail will return, grab the bait, and move off.  As line peels, the bail or lever is thrown, reel up tight and the boat is accelerated to set the hook.  The angler can assist by driving home the hook.

So there we were, three baits out, maybe 8:30 am when I heard a drag go off.  Willie instantly dropped the bait back.  When line started flying off the reel, he engaged, reeled tight and handed the rod to me while jamming the pedal to the metal.  The force of a large sail was substantial and I had to brace well to stay on the boat while Willie accelerated.

The sail was on for perhaps 20 seconds - then - gone.  Fast, furious and a final silence.  Whew!  What a start to the day. Sadly, the rest of the day was minimally productive with a number hits but no hookups.

All told we were on the water for eight hours as part of the fleet and enjoyed the day.  Saw a large sea turtle, and were passed by large pod of porpoises on the feed.  Beautiful!



:capn:

Note:  Kayak Willie's technique is covered in detail at the link in the opening post.  This interview is well worth your read...


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Tight lines,
Capn Jimbo

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Posted: Nov. 10 2007,16:17

hey don't sweat it, I'm sure Willie will give you one of his ... bon appetite!  lol.
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krash Offline
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Posted: Nov. 10 2007,17:40

Stinger Hooks, (thats a kingfish rig), for Sails

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SW, Live to Fish, Have Tackle will travel ... >,)))~> ~~~~
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Capn Jimbo Offline
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Posted: Nov. 11 2007,04:45

I'll tell ya, Willie does everything his own way.  Didn't like most rods so he built his own from good blanks to suit his kayak.  Doesn't like the way bobbers spook the ballyhoo, so he uses winecorks slit at one end cause they also cast and retrieve better.  And so on...

Yes, his rig is a stinger but resembles the Kingfish rig in name only and is constructed in his own fashion.  Doesn't like solid wire, feels braided flexwire is better.  Doesn't use trebles, feels it inhibits the live ballyhoo - rather uses two singles.  Uses a much shorter stinger and it is NOT attached to the bait.  Same reason.  Doesn't pin the lead hook nor use the usual attachment cause it's hard on the ballyhoo and he believes in maximum life and action.  You get the idea.

Honest, we trolled the ballyhoo for 4 hours and when we checked em they were as live as when we caught em.  


:capn:


Edited by Capn Jimbo on Nov. 11 2007,05:29

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FlatulentTuna Offline
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Posted: Nov. 11 2007,07:04

a bridle is the way to go...keeps em frisky for hours
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krash Offline
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Posted: Nov. 12 2007,05:04

Quote (Capn Jimbo @ Nov. 11 2007,07:45)
Yes, his rig is a stinger but resembles the Kingfish rig in name only and is constructed in his own fashion.  Doesn't like solid wire, feels braided flexwire is better.  

Splain it however you want its still a stinger rig and not needed for sails. Where does that hook end up when he catches a sail, likely in the throat, an eye, or a gill plate.

Wire is also not needed with sails, a simple live bait hook, or better yet circle hook, and mono leader.

Sorry to disagree Acp'n, just my humble opinion..


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