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Question: Perfect Paddle Part Two :: Total Votes:8
Poll choices Votes Statistics
210 cm 1  [12.50%]
215 cm 1  [12.50%]
220 cm 1  [12.50%]
225 cm 1  [12.50%]
230 cm 3  [37.50%]
235 cm 0  [0.00%]
240 cm 1  [12.50%]
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Topic: Perfect Paddle Part 2, length (where shorter is better)...< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
Capn Jimbo Offline
The Godfisher




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Posted: Aug. 09 2005,17:51

Paddle length is still an area of some debate.  It was not all that long ago that the standard recommendation was 230 cm.  In the last year or so there is a definite trend to shorter lengths - 210 to 220 cm.  And as you'll see there is good reason for this.

To begin: choosing a paddle length has been really misleading - you were either advised to pick the standard 230 (or heaven forbid, a 240) - or - were fitted by reaching up so that your hand could curl over the top of the paddle.  Same result for many.

Both of these are simply dead wrong.

Paddle length has little to do with your overall height and everything to do with your torso or sitting height - the distance from the seat/crotch to your nose.  This is true paddling height.  It is your shoulder height above the water that is a primary determinant of paddle length.  Using this measurement a tall short-torsoed paddler may need a shorter paddle than a short long-torsoed person.  Capish?

Other factors include yak width (wider = a little longer), seat height (higher = a little longer), paddling angle (high/low: low angle = longer), arm length (longer = longer) and blade length/width (longer/wider = a little longer).  What are we after is a paddle that will clear the deck and reach the water at our preferred angle of paddling.

Considering all though, most paddlers can benefit from a paddle shorter than 230 cm; indeed most yakkers would be well advised to select a paddle in the 210-220 range.  In my own case I was advised to buy a 230, but was accidentally sold a 220.  By the time I realized this I found I really liked the 220, and simply couldn't go back to the now unwieldy 230.  Since then I've purchased two adjustable S. African paddles that can be set from 210 to 220 and find I much prefer the 210.

It is an acquired preference.

:capn:

Have you ever tried a shorter paddle?  Do you intend to?  Will your next paddle be shorter or longer?

Next: Long vs Short in detail


Edited by Capn Jimbo on Aug. 10 2005,06:28

--------------
Tight lines,
Capn Jimbo

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Capn Jimbo Offline
The Godfisher




Group: Super Administrators
Posts: 1712
Joined: Jan. 2004
Posted: Aug. 09 2005,17:54

(Capn's Note: the following is a reprint from Mr. Scupper Pro Frank, who quite correctly caught my brain fart, in which I referred to all lengths in the 100's rather than, duh, the 200's.  Thank you Mr. Pro, Sir!)

JIM, WE'RE PADDLING KAYAKS
HERE, FRIEND, NOT CANOES!

We started out with a pair of Caviness double-ended 4-piece ~ 235 cm "oars" we got as part of our original Malibu II beginners package from Waterplay nearly 10 years ago.

These do NOT count... LOL!

I started out with a 240 cm Aquabound Seclude tourer.  It's now the giant of our stable.

Sally then got a big power-bladed Cannon spoon at around 235cm.  It's now our second-biggest "regular"/"real" paddle.

I picked up a Werner tourer at around 225 cm when I got the Perception Eclipse package of boat, paddle, PFD, farmer john, booties, and dry bag.

We got Sally's Bending Braches neoprene padded crank at around 220 or 223 as the latest paddle in our quiver.

Notice a pattern here...???

1) They're getting progressively shorter...

2) They're all still LONGER than Jim's longest example...

Now I still will use the old Aquabound in part because I paddle the S-Pro, and occasionally, the Scrambler XT, and they're wide; inpart because I'm tall-torsoed; in part because I'm long-armed; in part because I'm strong; in part because except for when I'm digging in to build speed, I really seem to have a more horizintal paddling style; and in part because I seem to have a slower natural paddling cadence than most.

But I find myself gravitating to the Werner, and even Sally's shorter BB, when I'm in my Eclipse or Sally's Tracer SINKs.

It's a toss-up when I'm in the Isthmus -the shorter paddles like the Werner and the BB should be better for the narrow 21" beam of the I, but the longer, heavier A-Bound actually tends to "work" better for me: think of the Wallendas and their poles... ROTFL!!!

But the trend is readily apparent nonetheless -we seem to be tending towards more vertical paddling styles with shorter paddles, or vice-versa, more or less.

But none are anywhere as short as your longest offerring, Jim...!!!

And contrary to your selections offered, I'll always chose a MUCH longer unit to

Paddle on...


--------------
Tight lines,
Capn Jimbo

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1 replies since Aug. 09 2005,17:51 < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

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