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Topic: Jigger Poling, whaaaaa?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
Capn Jimbo Offline
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Posted: Oct. 26 2007,14:52

Just read a verrrrry interesting article bout the technique of "jigger poling".  And quite honestly it sounds pretty good.  Here's the deal:

The "jigger pole'' was traditionally a stout rod made of bamboo, from 15 to 20 ft long.  A short length of stout, non-stretching dacron line (25-100 lb test) was tied about 2 ft from the tip, then again at 1 foot, and finally to the tip (in case of breakage).  A "running line" of about 10 inches or so dangles from the tip.

Lures used include most top waters, Jitterbugs, prop baits, jointed crankbaits, jigs and even live baits.  The idea is to reach back into the weeds or cover - way back - then lightly tap the tip of the jigger pole on the water while swishing the lure around in circles, back-and-forth or figure eights.  

Usually targeted were big, big bass who finally would smash the aggravating lure.  Compare to a cast lure that is only in the area briefly.  The strikes are vicious and hard and the fish usually hooks itself.  Once hooked the pole is quickly hand-over-handed pulling the often large fish out of the cover and to the boat.

The modern jigger poles are available for very reasonable prices from Mocco Inc. of Dallas and BnM Mfg of Mississippi who have been producing these rods for many years.  Mocco offers a telescoping 15 footer, rigged with 50 lb test dacron and a graphite reel, with a Storm Bug lure and video for just $69.95!  

Worth a try, methinks...

Fishing in normally unapproached or inaccessible cover is reported to be VERY productive.  It is explosive and fun.  Although this method is being used to target big bass (10 lb plus), I could not help but wonder whether this technique might be effective in the mangroves...

Whaddya think?


:capn:


Link to BnM "Black Widow"


Edited by Capn Jimbo on Oct. 27 2007,07:44

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FlatulentTuna Offline
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Posted: Oct. 27 2007,06:02

I think it could work....anchor up so you could loiter long enough...and yank the prey species out of cover...drop anchor quickley...and go for a sleigh ride. maybe no anchor...line might...will in my case..get fouled on line.    I could be in the middle of the dead sea...and get a snag on the suface
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Capn Jimbo Offline
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Posted: Oct. 27 2007,06:35

Apparently the concept, at least for bass fishing, is to create a bit of a ruckus on and near the surface.  The technique is to grip the pole far enough up so the butt is near your elbow.  Then your other hand grips the pole about two feet higher.  The lower hand and forearm provide stability - the upper hand creates the action. At a point, the big bass becomes aggressive and a vicious strike ensues.

If not already hooked, the technique is not to lift the long pole, but to jerk it back toward you and then pull it hand-over-hand back toward you.  Fishers use very stout line - up to 100 lb test (dacron, non-stretch) - so as to be able to wrestle the (hopefully) large fish out of the cover over sharp branches, etc.  The pole is not lifted (esp. important in a kayak).

I am particularly intrigued that the jigger poles now being sold are telescoping - perfect for kayak transport and use.

Now the primary target for me would be to try this for snook - however I'm not clear on whether the "ruckus" technique is appropriate - might spook the snook.  It might not.  

Whaddya think guys?


:capn:

Additional factoids:

1.  When using cane poles the line is tied at 2 or 3 joints beginning near and going to the tip, eg tie 2 joints down, spiral the line around the pole, tie at first joint, spiral the line, then finally at the tip.  This was done due the tendency of bamboo to break near the tip when wrestling a big bass.

2.  AKA "skittering", "doodle-socking", et al.

3.  May have originated in old Florida (where else), as described by famed naturalist William Bartram in 1773-1778  - as long-established even then!

4.  Most lures were (and are) homemade using a large (and noisy) spinner with a treble hook dressed with feathers, etc., often with a strip of rind.


Edited by Capn Jimbo on Oct. 27 2007,06:52

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Scupper Pro Frank Offline
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Posted: Oct. 27 2007,07:38

JIM & YAKANGLERS, THE JIGGER IN THE MANGROVES MIGHT WORK...

...too well???

If you drop the lure in the midst of the mangroves roots where you could only cast one by mistake, and give the lure the old tap-tap-tap wiggle-waggle, you're probably in great hunting territory.  However, if'n when a big ole hungry snook grabs it, it's liable to become a real knot as the fish dashed among and between the roots.

If you drop it at the edge, it's where you'd cast it anyhow, right?  

About the only advantage would be is that you'd be able to twitch the bait in place, and not have to pull on it in any direction to get it to move.

And it wonder what'd happen if'n you hooked, say, a 20 or so-pound fish, like a good snook, a big barracuda, or a shark... (All RIIIIGHT! BIG fish on!) that yanked hard and used the rod as a giant fulcrum with (relatively, compared to the usual rod+line 'shock absorber' combo) a relatively easily-swiveled-about-its-axis and tippy side-to-side kayak...???

I had a big one just about pull me out a few years back, and that was with a bent rod and pulling out on the drag as I let my arms be an additional shock absorber, jerking both me and the S-Pro around for 2 big, one to port, one to starboard, shakes before it spit the hook...  

Actually, it might be fun with this new 'jigger pole' -but you also might hafta climb back onto your yak after going for more than a sleigh ride, before you could continue and


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Capn Jimbo Offline
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Posted: Oct. 27 2007,08:13

Yup, just might be onto something here.  The famed Frank Sargeant, in his book "The Snook Book" speaks of the late Clyde Parish of Tampa who worked big baits (up to 12 in.) at night around piers and pilings for megasized snook.  He used a forged 5/0 hook, a live 12 in. trout or ladyfish, 100 lb test and one-inch thick "Calcutta Pole" (a solid species of bamboo).  

He routinely brought in huge snook.

Fishing author Ron Brooks of Key West writes of his experience going after Goliath grouper going from 50 to hundreds of pounds using a 16 ft Calcutta rigged with 1/8" nylon rope (!), a stout stainless  00 swivel, 12/0 hook, 6 oz. sinker and 120 lb test wire leader.  He fished in the channels and mangroves for these huge specimens.

Link to Ron Brook's moving article "Goliath Grouper - The biggest fish you ever saw caught on a cane pole! "



:capn:


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amhirsc0 Offline
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Posted: Oct. 27 2007,08:41

If the goal is to get a lure within 20 feet of you, accurately placed in a small water patch surrounded by snagging vegetation, then an alternative may well be use a flipping rod may be an alternative to achieve this goal.  Flipping rods typically are 8 to 9 feet long using ordinary reels, and if filled with lines such as 'Power Pro" can be powerful enough to set a hook and yank a fish out of cover.  And when not fishing a hole in cover they can be used as an ordinary rod.

Flipping is an underhanded casting technique where little or no line is let out during the cast, but is a means that insures high accuracy.  The jiigger pole is obviously more accurate, and was orriginally used for freshwater crappie or bream fishing.  But, the use of a 15 foot pole from a kayak with 50 pound test line that, as scupper pro Frank points out, can be the cause of being flipped.  My guess is that if you fish from a yak that is 30 inches or more in beam, then jigger fishing may be appropriate, but at 26 inches or less it is questionable.

Flipping rods are available from several manufactures and are typically marketed as salmon rods.  TFO offers both conventional and spinning reel models, 8'6" and 9' in length.  TFO began as a salt water, fly fishing rod company, and I suspect the long rods for spinning or conventional reels are similar to heavy weight fly rods, which means they can cast light lures but have enough backbone to handle large fish.


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Capn Jimbo Offline
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Posted: Oct. 27 2007,18:00

The B'n'M "Black Widow" Jigging Pole:



Yup, I just hadda buy one.  "What!? Another rod?" said Sue Sea as I ran into Bass Pro.  I managed to avoid almost all the sidewalk sale items, and this gem was just $22.95.  How could I say no?  Of course I test a number of other telescoping rods but found the Black Widow light and strong.  This one is 16.5 ft., in 5 sections...



The same model is just $16.77 plus shipping direct from B'n'M.  A 20 ft, 6-section model is $23.57 plus shipping.  Mine is 46 inches  collapsed, has a screw-off butt cap (you can remove all the sections, plus a rubber top end stopper.  There are two fittings about 3 feet from the butt that function as line keepers.



I have now learned that the Black Widow is not the strongest rod made by B'n'M - that would be the Tuff Lite series which is $3 to $9 more but is capable of handling big bass and I would assume many snook.



:capn:


Edited by Capn Jimbo on Oct. 27 2007,18:39

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Tanner Offline
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Posted: Oct. 28 2007,04:15

Capn,
What's the butt section look like?
At a stowage length of 46", I can see this on my kayak.


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"A good rule of angling philosophy is not to interfere with any fisherman’s ways of being happy, unless you want to be hated." -Zane Grey, Tales of Fishes, 1919
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Capn Jimbo Offline
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Posted: Oct. 28 2007,06:18

Hey Tan... ltns, I'm glad you're still around. The bottom of the butt section has a rubber cap, finished by a screw off plastic cap.  This is so you can remove all the sections - perhaps to clean them?  Not really sure.

Tan, you will be amazed at its very light weight and how easy it is to set up.  Sue Sea and I got to the launch area and she just hadda see my new expenditure.  So I popped off the top rubber plug, gave it a single back-and-forth shake and it exploded out to its full length (don't you dare Fishhead!) and was ready to go.

The way I figure it the 80 to 100 lb test line is prerigged, stored on the line keeper.  Remove, thread thru the tip, shake, roll and spiral a few turns round the pole and enough left for a couple wraps around the keepers.

Quick and ready to go.  Fast and easy storage.  Drop it and it floats.  

I know you're really big on bass, or rather big on BIG bass, so this might be a cool addition to your arsenal.  Here's a coupla quotes...

Quote
Through study, research and experimentation, Howell learned the tactic of shake-pole fishing that anglers used with deadly efficiency on bass 30, 40 and 50 years ago and began to make converts to this very-productive way to fish. Until recently, fishermen only taught this new gospel by word of mouth. One angler would demonstrate the tactic to a buddy and converted that angler to the gospel of jiggerpoling. Thus the use of the old technique spread, particularly throughout the South.

From all indications, this forgotten fishing strategy will produce more and bigger bass than conventional methods have in the past.

In the first six weeks Green utilized a jiggerpole, he caught more big bass than he'd ever taken before in his life. According to Green, "Jiggerpole fishing is deadly. I caught and released 15 bass in the first six weeks that weighed over 5-pounds each. The biggest one I took was an 8-pound, 3-ounce largemouth. Also since using this jiggerpole tactic, I've caught 30 or 40 largemouth that will weigh 3- to 5- pounds each here on the Warrior River, which is not known as a big-bass river." What makes Green's testimony even more phenomenal, he only fishes one to two hours in the late afternoon after he leaves his job.


This technique allows you to work a shore thoroughly and effectively- every opening, every hole, every tangle - the entire edge can be slow trolled.   No missed opportunities.  And allows you to keep the lure in one spot long enough to cause vicious strikes.  

More anon...


:capn:

...FYI, Tanner is one of the original FLYCr's and was of immeasureable help at the Yak-In's.  He's a great guy, friendly, helps others, does both salt and fresh, but really loves bass.  Still remember our trip to Holiday Park and all the big gators lying in wait.  When it turned dark, I spooked and left, was just about to land when a bunch of Hispanic kids waved me off - just then a 15 footer exploded out of the weeds right where I was gonna land...


Edited by Capn Jimbo on Oct. 28 2007,06:46

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Tanner Offline
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Posted: Oct. 28 2007,09:08

I'm sold.

Not too worried about a wet exit. I see two angles coming into play to control your stability and thats all part of kayak fishing. With a little common sense, it shouldn't be a problem

I'm thinking it will be a "situation specific" use for me. A couple of spots come to mind.

BTW, I remember that gator. Chef Mike and I named him Charlie. I told Chef one night to "look for Charlie, that's Charlie's beach Chef". As Chef stroked on by me I heard him say, " oh yea? well Charlie don't yak!"


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"A good rule of angling philosophy is not to interfere with any fisherman’s ways of being happy, unless you want to be hated." -Zane Grey, Tales of Fishes, 1919
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